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Posts Tagged ‘Geographic information system’

Lancaster University
Friday 30th November, 2012
Geographical Information Systems (GIS) are becoming increasingly used by historians, archaeologists, literary scholars, classicists and others with an interest in humanities geographies. Take-up has been hampered by a lack of understanding of what GIS is and what it has to offer to these disciplines. This free workshop, sponsored by the European Research Council’s Spatial Humanities: Texts, GIS, Placesproject and hosted by Lancaster University, will provide a basic introduction to GIS both as an approach to academic study and as a technology. Its key aims are: To establish why the use of GIS is important to the humanities; to stress the key abilities offered by GIS, particularly the capacity to integrate, analyse and visualise a wide range of data from many different types of sources; to show the pitfalls associated with GIS and thus encourage a more informed and subtle understanding of the technology; and, to provide a basic overview of GIS software and data.

Timetable:
9:30   Registration
10:00 Welcome and Introductions
10:15 Session 1: Fundamentals of GIS from a humanities perspective.
11:45 Session 2: Case studies of the use of GIS in the humanities.
13:00 Lunch
14:00 Session 3: Getting to grips with GIS software and data.
15:30 Roundtable discussion – going further with GIS.
16:30 Close

Who should come?
The workshop is aimed at a broad audience including post-graduate or masters students,members of academic staffcurriculum and research managers, and holders of major grants and those intending to apply for major grants.  Professionals in other relevant sectors interested in finding out about GIS applications are also welcome.  This workshop is only intended as an introduction to GIS, so will suit novices or those who want to brush up previous experience. It does not include any hands-on use of software – this will be covered in later events to be held 11-12th April and 15-18th July 2013.

How much will it cost?
The workshop is free of charge.  Lunch and refreshments are included. We do not provide accommodation but can recommend convenient hotels and B&Bs if required.

How do I apply?
Places are limited and priority will be given to those who apply early. As part of registering please include a brief description of your research interests and what you think you will gain from the workshop. This should not exceed 200 words.
For more details of this and subsequent events see:http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/spatialhum/training.html. To register please email a booking form (attached or available from the website) to: I.Gregory@lancaster.ac.uk who may also be contacted with informal enquiries.

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Digital History
31 May 2011
Professor Richard Rodger (Edinburgh)
Space, place and the city: a simple anti-GIS approach for historians

 

William EDGAR- City and Castle of Edinburgh 1765

 

If you suggest using GIS (geographical information system) to an historian they might look back at you blankly or with a look of mild horror on their face.  For many historians GIS is viewed (not unfairly) as a complicated tool best left to others.  However, its potential usefulness in answering and revealing research questions is pretty much indisputable.  Richard Rodger wants to show that working on the spatial does not necessarily require GIS work and where it does, it is often highly rewarding.  In this paper Rodger wants to look at alternatives to GIS, to more simple processes for investigating the spatial.  He does this not just with the academic historian in mind, but also the local historian, the student, and other interested researchers.  Using pre-established geo-referencing tools and by following straight forward techniques can be highly rewarding and relatively easy to learn.  Take the Google Maps platform as an example.  Rodger describes in this paper how to use Google tools to map spatially various statistical data with minimum of effort.  Then there is his own project, Visualising Urban Geographies, which uses Edinburgh as a template for building mapping tools specifically designed for use by historians.  By investigating data by addresses or districts, this project allows historians to create spatial boundaries to link maps to the boundaries of data.  In other words a set of district records can be mapped accurately and displayed in a way useful for interpretation. 

Rodger wants everyone to be able to investigate the spatial and emphasises that it does not necessarily need to be complicated or time consuming. 

To listen to this podcast/video please click here.

 

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