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The next IHR live stream will take place at 5.15pm on 14 May 2013 with the Digital History seminar.  Details below:

Digital History seminar
Matthew Hammond
The People of Medieval Scotland database: structure, prosopography and network visualisation
 
 
The People of Medieval Scotland 1093-1314 website (click on image to view)

The People of Medieval Scotland 1093-1314 website (click on image to view)

This is a seminar about a prosopographical database, ‘The People of Medieval Scotland, 1093-1314’, which has been in production since 2007, and which has been freely available online since the summer of 2010. Since the relaunch of the database last year, we have had over 40,000 unique visitors from across the globe. Now nearing completion, the database contains records on over 20,000 individuals, drawn from over 8500 medieval, mostly Latin documents. The paper will examine some of the PoMS project’s technical innovations as well as the new directions we hope to take in the coming years.

The seminar will take you behind the scenes of the public website to see how this database evolved from the factoid prosopography model created for the ‘Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England’ (PASE) by John Bradley of the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, now Department of Digital Humanities, at Kings College London. PoMS has developed what might be called a ‘transactional model’ of factoid prosopography, due to the fact that it is comprised almost entirely of transactional documents like charters. Rather than simply recording events, the transactional model is explicitly interested in relations between individuals as recorded in the documents. We will examine the new structures PoMS incorporates to allow end users the ability to research the terms of the transaction, and thus the nature of the interaction between people, as well as multiple transactions happening at different times within the same document. We will look at the work of Michele Pasin, formerly of DDH, in developing new ways for users to both search and visualise these transactions. The seminar will finish with a consideration of the capabilities of the database for studying the social networks, and visualising the relationships between large numbers of people.

Matthew Hammond is a Research Associate in the School of Humanities at the University of Glasgow and former Lecturer in Scottish History at the University of Edinburgh. Since 2007, he has been a team member of the AHRC-funded projects that created the ‘People of Medieval Scotland, 1093-1286’ database (www.poms.ac.uk) and is now working on a Leverhulme-funded project to expand the capabilities of that database, especially in the area of Social Network Analysis.

To take part in the live stream visit History SPOT on 14 May at 5.15pm and open up the pop out video, slide show, chat, and twitter feed.

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Occasionally History SPOT plays host to podcasts created beyond the IHR.  The Global History seminar  and Franco-British seminar are excellent examples of this.  Most recently, we have played host to the proceedings of a 2011 conference by the Historians of Education in Scotland.  The conference, held at the Royal Society of Edinburgh on 21 October 2011 investigated various elements of education in Scotland over the last 200 years.  More information can be found on the Historians of Education in Scotland website that is currently in development. 

The abstracts from the conference papers are all available on the History SPOT blog or in the form of a pdf on the podcast page.  For ease of access the list below will bring you directly to the blog post/abstract for each talk:

 

Robert Anderson (University of Edinburgh), ‘Edinburgh schools and Edinburgh University: some evidence from the early twentieth century’

 

Atsuko Betchaku (University of Edinburgh), ‘Japanese education and social welfare policies and Scottish evangelicals, 1870s to the 1920s’

 

Christopher Bischof (Rutgers University), ‘Pay, prestige and lifestyle: the hiring of elementary teachers in Glasgow and the Highlands and Islands, 1846-1902’

 

David Dick (Edinburgh Napier University), ‘How was female education affected by Scottish claims for educational and intellectual democracy?’

 

Helen Lees (University of Stirling), ‘A history of elective home education in Scotland’

 

Glenda White (University of Glasgow), ‘David Stow and teacher education’

 

and of the closing plenary, featuring the follow linked papers:
Ian J. Deary and Martin Lawn, ‘Reconstructing Godfrey Thomson and the Scottish School of Educational Research, 1925-1950’
Martin Lawn and Ian J. Deary, ‘The new model school of education: Godfrey Thomson, Moray House and Teachers College, Columbia’

 

Inclusion of podcasts from events beyond the IHR is something that we are keen to encourage.  Not only does it expand our range of resources, but it also enables historians to find podcasts that would otherwise be difficult to discover when on their own.  Only historians directly interested in Scottish educational history are likely to find the podcasts on the HEd website, yet the content of these podcasts might well be interesting to historians whose primary interest intersect that discussed in one or all of the papers.   The wider availability and findability of podcasts is something that the IHR is taking very seriously and future updates to History SPOT will reflect this. 

In the meantime if anyone has audio or video recordings from History conferences, seminars or other events that they think might fit within History SPOT then please do get in touch with us at history.spot@sas.ac.uk.   

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Historians of Education in Scotland (HEdScot) conference 2011
Glenda White (University of Glasgow)
David Stow and teacher education
21 October 2011
 

Abstract: In his day job David Stow was a successful carpet manufacturer but when, at the age of eighteen, he joined St Mary’s Parish Church in the Trongate he quickly flourished as one of Thomas Chalmers’ ‘boys’. An enthusiastic activist, he taught for ten years amongst the rags and squalor of the east end, honing the teaching skills, philosophy, and attitudes to children which were to make him one of the most influential educators of his generation. With the growing need for trained teachers, two of his weekdays schools, St John’s and St Andrew’s, were selected as ‘model’ schools for the training of teachers. This quickly led to the foundation, in 1837, of the first teacher-training institution in Great Britain based on a Stow’s comprehensive but detailed ‘system’. This paper will critically examine the considerable contribution which Stow made to teacher education in Scotland asking, controversially, if we have made much progress.

To listen to this podcast and the others from this conference click here.

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Historians of Education in Scotland (HEdScot) conference 2011
Helen Lees (University of Stirling)
A history of elective home education in Scotland?
21 October 2011

Abstract: This paper aims to uncover the historical line of development that elective home education has taken in Scotland. Set within the context of the wider, global, home education movement, the ways in which the discovery and choice to home educate in Scotland have historically emerged and now operate, will be shown. An argument is made for more research on home education in Scotland to be conducted to help an identification of what education is in Scotland when it is not conflated with schooling.

To listen to this podcast click here.

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Historians of Education in Scotland (HEdScot) conference 2011
David Dick (Edinburgh Napier University)
How was Female Education affected by Scottish Claims for Educational and Intellectual Democracy?
21 October 2011

Traditionally the ‘national’ system of education in Scotland claimed pride in its democracy which was based partly on its openness of access to its universities and partly on its intellectuality. The former is usually explained through the opportunity and access for the ‘lad o’ pairts’ – the boy from the Kailyard, but never for a ‘lass o’pairts’, and the latter for its preparation for living in a democracy with its roots in the Scottish Enlightenment. This democratic tradition is explored and challenged on the basis of the long and arduous struggle during the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries for females in gaining entry to the portals of our four severely meritocratic and patriarchal universities. It is intended to show the impediments as well as the slow educational and legal processes which eventually allowed women to attend some classes and ultimately to be permitted to matriculate and become full members of our universities.

To listen to this podcast click here.

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Historians of Education in Scotland (HEdScot) conference 2011
Christopher Bischof (Rutgers University)
Pay, Prestige, and Lifestyle: the Hiring of Elementary Teachers in Glasgow and the Highlands and Islands, 1846-1902
21 October 2011

Abstract: This paper examines the negotiation between school officials (managers and school boards), communities, and applicants in the hiring of elementary teachers in Glasgow and the highlands and islands between 1846 and 1902. It adopts a comparative approach, contrasting the depersonalized, rigidly bureaucratic approach to the selection of teachers in Glasgow with the more organic approach taken in the Highlands and Islands. Unsurprisingly, since it paid the highest salaries, Glasgow demanded the highest qualifications of its new hires of anywhere in Scotland. There was little else to the hiring process in Glasgow: certain qualifications were demanded, and a certain salary was paid; it was all fixed and attempts at negotiation were typically rebuffed. In the highlands and islands, unlike in Glasgow, the hiring process itself involved negotiation and unquantifiable requirements and inducements. Sometimes a large garden, living in or near the community in which they had grown up, and the independence of a headmastership (rather than an assistantship) could compensate well-qualified teachers for the lack of pay in rural schools. Teachers responded to offers by requesting higher salaries and other things, like the right to have siblings live in the schoolhouse with them. Communities also intervened in the hiring process in the highlands and islands, most commonly by exerting pressure on school officials to hire a male teacher, which, though they cost more, were widely believed to be more prestigious. The process of hiring teachers reveals much about the values of and power relations between teachers, school officials, and communities.

To listen to this podcast click here.

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Historians of Education in Scotland (HEdScot) conference 2011
Atsuko Betchaku (University of Edinburgh)
Japanese education and social welfare policies and Scottish Evangelicals, 1870s to the 1920s
21 October 2011

David Stow (1793-1864)

Abstract: This paper considers how Scottish Evangelicals’ ideas in morality and moral education were influential in late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries Japan in relationship with the areas of social welfare and education.  It focuses on the influence of ideas by Thomas Chalmers and David Stow, two leading members of Scottish Evangelicals in the mid-nineteenth century. The analysis of their ideas shows how moral education and welfare system were closely related in their thinking. Their influence in Japan reflects this feature.

This paper considers Stow’s influence in Japanese ideas of moral education. Although overt Christian aspects of his ideas were not introduced, his core ideas of moral education became influential from the 1880s. However, only after the 1890s when Japan started facing social unrest Chalmers’ emphasis on education and family visitation system started to get an attention.  This paper considers Britain’s moral influence in Japanese governmental policies hitherto neglected.

To listen to this podcast click here.

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